Bio Bibliography Definition Example

Bio-Bibliographies and Composer Resource Manuals

Bio-bibliographies and composer resource manuals are an excellent place to begin research on a composer. Frequently, they describe the current state of scholarly research, important developments in the research history, and highlight important experts in the field. They also furnish other useful information such as the locations of manuscripts and archives important to research on this composer. As is evident from the name, bio-bibliographies usually consist of two major components: a biography providing a linear overview of the composer’s life and significant compositions followed by a bibliography, which occupies the majority of the book.

In general, a bio-bibliography lists the most significant resources available on the composer while striving to provide a representative view of the literature. For lesser-known or obscure composers for which little literature is available, attempts may be made at reasonable comprehensiveness. A bio-bibliography on a popular composer, however, may narrow its scope to a representation of simply the best research or resources. In any case, most bibliographies consist of scholarly publications, dissertations and theses, and articles from scholarly periodicals. Some may also include reviews of performances or premieres. Increasingly common are discographies/videographies/filmographies. Citations are almost always grouped by resource type or subject (e.g., encyclopedias, analyses of compositions, composer histories, reviews) and then organized alphabetically within these classifications by author’s name (or by title if no author is present). At minimum, entries consist of a bibliographic citation and an annotation; at most, an ISBN or ISSN and LC call number will also accompany.

Two established series of bio-bibliographies are “Guides to Research” by Routledge and “Bio-Bibliographies in Music” published by Greenwood Press. By and large, they are similar in content and composition; however, it is worth noting that the Greenwood Press series typically includes a complete works list, while the Routledge series does not.

Bio-bibliographies are typically assigned call numbers under the Library of Congress classification of ML 134, integrated with the thematic catalogues.

Selected Examples:

Ayotte, Benjamin McKay. Heinrich Schenker: A Guide to Research. Routledge Music Bibliographies. New York: Routledge, 2004.

Abravanel, Claude. Claude Debussy: A Bibliography. Detroit Studies in Music Bibliography 29. Detroit, Michigan: Information Coordinators, 1974.

Flury, Roger. Pietro Mascagni: A Bio-Bibliography. Bio-Bibliographies in Music 82. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2001.

Langford, Jeffrey Alan. Hector Berlioz: A Guide to Research. Garland Composer Resource Manuals 22. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities 1,025. New York: Garland, 1989.

Marvin, Clara. Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina: A Guide to Research. Routledge Music Bibliographies. New York: Routledge, 2002.

Namenwirth, Simon Michael. Gustav Mahler: A Critical Bibliography. 3 vols. Wiesbaden: O. Harrassowitz, 1987.

Parker, Mary Ann. G. F. Handel: A Guide to Research. 2nd ed. Routledge Music Bibliographies. New York: Routledge, 2005.

Perone, James E. Louis Moreau Gottschalk: A Bio-Bibliography. Bio-Bibliographies in Music 91. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2002.

Richart, Robert W. György Ligeti: A Bio-Bibliography. Bio-Bibliographies in Music 30. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1990.

Saffle, Michael. Richard Wagner: A Research and Information Guide. 2nd ed. Routledge Music Bibliographies. New York: Routledge, 2010.

WHAT IS AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY?

An annotated bibliography is a list of citations to books, articles, and documents. Each citation is followed by a brief (usually about 150 words) descriptive and evaluative paragraph, the annotation. The purpose of the annotation is to inform the reader of the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the sources cited.


ANNOTATIONS VS. ABSTRACTS

Abstracts are the purely descriptive summaries often found at the beginning of scholarly journal articles or in periodical indexes. Annotations are descriptive and critical; they may describe the author's point of view, authority, or clarity and appropriateness of expression.


THE PROCESS

Creating an annotated bibliography calls for the application of a variety of intellectual skills: concise exposition, succinct analysis, and informed library research.

First, locate and record citations to books, periodicals, and documents that may contain useful information and ideas on your topic. Briefly examine and review the actual items. Then choose those works that provide a variety of perspectives on your topic.

Cite the book, article, or document using the appropriate style.

Write a concise annotation that summarizes the central theme and scope of the book or article. Include one or more sentences that (a) evaluate the authority or background of the author, (b) comment on the intended audience, (c) compare or contrast this work with another you have cited, or (d) explain how this work illuminates your bibliography topic.


CRITICALLY APPRAISING THE BOOK, ARTICLE, OR DOCUMENT

For guidance in critically appraising and analyzing the sources for your bibliography, see How to Critically Analyze Information Sources. For information on the author's background and views, ask at the reference desk for help finding appropriate biographical reference materials and book review sources.


CHOOSING THE CORRECT FORMAT FOR THE CITATIONS

Check with your instructor to find out which style is preferred for your class. Online citation guides for both the Modern Language Association (MLA) and the American Psychological Association (APA) styles are linked from the Library's Citation Management page.


SAMPLE ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ENTRY FOR A JOURNAL ARTICLE

 

The following example uses APA style (Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition, 2010) for the journal citation:

Waite, L. J., Goldschneider, F. K., & Witsberger, C. (1986). Nonfamily living and the erosion of traditional family orientations among young adults. American Sociological Review,51, 541-554.

The authors, researchers at the Rand Corporation and Brown University, use data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women and Young Men to test their hypothesis that nonfamily living by young adults alters their attitudes, values, plans, and expectations, moving them away from their belief in traditional sex roles. They find their hypothesis strongly supported in young females, while the effects were fewer in studies of young males. Increasing the time away from parents before marrying increased individualism, self-sufficiency, and changes in attitudes about families. In contrast, an earlier study by Williams cited below shows no significant gender differences in sex role attitudes as a result of nonfamily living.

 

This example uses MLA style (MLA Handbook, 8th edition, 2016) for the journal citation:

Waite, Linda J., et al. "Nonfamily Living and the Erosion of Traditional Family Orientations Among Young Adults." American Sociological Review, vol. 51, no. 4, 1986, pp. 541-554.

The authors, researchers at the Rand Corporation and Brown University, use data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women and Young Men to test their hypothesis that nonfamily living by young adults alters their attitudes, values, plans, and expectations, moving them away from their belief in traditional sex roles. They find their hypothesis strongly supported in young females, while the effects were fewer in studies of young males. Increasing the time away from parents before marrying increased individualism, self-sufficiency, and changes in attitudes about families. In contrast, an earlier study by Williams cited below shows no significant gender differences in sex role attitudes as a result of nonfamily living.

0 thoughts on “Bio Bibliography Definition Example”

    -->

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *